Jif peanut butter | Photo: Mike Mozart / Flickr (Creative Commons)

State health officials are warning Illinois residents to immediately dispose of recalled Jif peanut butter products that may be contaminated with salmonella.

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced Tuesday that they are working with local health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to investigate the multi-state outbreak of salmonella infections linked to certain Jif peanut butter products.

On Friday, the J.M. Smucker Company recalled multiple types of Jif peanut butter due to potential salmonella contamination.

Epidemiologic and laboratory data show some Jif peanut butter products may be contaminated with salmonella, IDPH said.

The CDC said 14 people from 12 states were infected with salmonella, with illnesses starting February 17.

One case included in the outbreak investigation was from central Illinois.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) believes Jif peanut butter produced at the J.M. Smucker Company facility in Lexington, Kentucky, is the likely cause of illnesses in the salmonella outbreak.

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Consumers should check this list of recalled products to see if they have any and check the lot code number of the container located next to the “best if used by” date.

If the lot code number is between 1274425 through 2140425 with “425” at the end of the first seven numbers, the product should be disposed of immediately.

Recalled Jif peanut butter should not be eaten, sold or served to any humans or animals, health officials said.

Surfaces and containers that may have touched the recalled peanut butter should be washed with hot, soapy water.

Symptoms of salmonella include fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

Anyone experiencing these symptoms 12 to 72 hours after consuming Jif peanut butter products should contact their health care provider.

Health officials in Illinois are continuing to work on identifying additional cases and performing lab testing, IDPH added.

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