Robert E. Crimo III, 21, of Highwood

A judge has ordered a 21-year-old man held without bond for allegedly killing seven people and injuring over 45 others who were attending a parade in Highland Park on the Fourth of July.

Robert E. Crimo III, 21, of Highwood, was charged with seven counts of first-degree murder “for the killing spree that he has unleashed against our community,” Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart announced Tuesday evening.

Dozens of additional charges centering around each victim, like attempted murder, aggravated battery and aggravated discharge of a firearm, are expected, Rinehart said.

“These seven counts of first-degree murder will lead to a mandatory life sentence should he be convicted without the possibility of parole,” he said.

Crimo appeared in court remotely from the Lake County Jail Wednesday morning.

Prosecutors charged Robert E. Crimo III, 21, (pictured) with seven counts of first-degree murder after he allegedly killed seven people and injured dozens during a mass shooting in downtown Highland Park Monday morning. | Provided Photos

Crimo said he would not be retaining a lawyer and Lake County Judge Theodore Potkonjak appointed him a public defender.

Lake County Assistant State’s Attorney Ben Dillon said during the bond hearing that the ATF conducted an e-trace of the rifle used in the shooting to track it to Crimo and law enforcement officers identified Crimo based on surveillance video.

Crimo confessed to the shooting at the Highland Park Police Department and admitted to dressing up as a woman to disguise himself.

He admitted to opening fire on the crowd and said he fired two full 30-round magazines before loading a third 30-round magazine and firing, Dillon said.

Crimo identified himself on surveillance video and the weapon used, Dillon added.

Lake County Assistant Public Defender Gregory Ticsay said Crimo does not have money to post for bond.

Prosecutors had filed a petition to hold Crimo without bond due to the man’s “threat to the community.”

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Potkonjak granted the petition, ordering Crimo held without bond.

Potkonjak scheduled the next court hearing in the case for July 28 for a preliminary hearing.

Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart announces first-degree murder charges against Robert E. Crimo III, 21, who allegedly killed seven people and injured dozens in a mass shooting in downtown Highland Park Monday morning. | Photo: Willie Gillespie (@wgweather)

Police and prosecutors are expected to hold a press conference later Wednesday morning.

Rinehart, who is a resident of Highland Park, recognized the first responders who responded to the shooting and members of the community that reached out to offer assistance, calling it “one of the most uplifting things I have ever seen in Lake County’s history.”

He called the shooting a “premeditated” and “calculated” attack.

Lake County Coroner Jennifer Banek identified the victims as Katherine Goldstein, 64, of Highland Park; Irina McCarthy, 35, of Highland Park; Kevin McCarthy, 37, of Highland Park; Jacquelyn Sundheim, 63, of Highland Park; Stephen Straus, 88, of Highland Park; and Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza, 78, of Morelos, Mexico.

Autopsies on the six were completed Tuesday at the Lake County Coroner’s Office.

The identity of the seventh victim who died at a hospital on Tuesday is being withheld until an autopsy is completed by the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office.

Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza, 78, of Morelos, Mexico, (left) and Jacki Sundheim, 63, of Highland Park, (right) were among seven victims killed in the mass shooting in downtown Highland Park Monday morning. | Inset: Provided; Background: Woo-Sung Shim / Lake and McHenry County Scanner

Lake County Major Crime Task Force Spokesman Christopher Covelli said that Crimo pre-planned the attack for several weeks.

Crimo allegedly brought a high-powered rifle to the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

Covelli said that Crimo used a fire escape ladder to access the roof of a building on the parade route.

Crimo then allegedly opened fire on parade-goers, killing seven people and injuring over 40 people. Over 70 rounds were fired from the rifle.

Crimo, who was dressed as a woman, exited the roof, dropped the rifle and escaped with the fleeing crowd, according to Covelli.

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He then walked to his mother’s Highland Park home, which is nearby the parade route, and borrowed her silver 2010 Honda Fit, Covelli said.

A person spotted the wanted Honda Fit as it traveled southbound on Route 41 in North Chicago around 6:30 p.m. Monday as an intense manhunt was underway.

The person called 911 and a North Chicago police officer who was sitting at Route 41 and Buckley Road in North Chicago spotted Crimo drive past in the vehicle, Covelli and Highland Park Police Chief Lou Jogmen said.

Robert E. Crimo III, 21, (inset) was taken into custody by police officers at Route 41 and Westleigh Road in Lake Forest following a police pursuit involving his mother’s silver Honda Fit Monday evening. | Background Photo: Willie Gillespie (@wgweather)

A short pursuit ensued and it came to an end at Route 41 and Westleigh Road in Lake Forest.

Officers arrested Crimo and located a second rifle in his vehicle. The two rifles along with three other guns seized were legally purchased by Crimo himself.

Covelli said in a follow-up press conference Tuesday afternoon that law enforcement had two prior encounters with Crimo.

One of those occurred in April 2019 when Highland Park police responded to a delayed report from a family member that Crimo attempted suicide.

Officers spoke to Crimo and his parents and determined the matter was being handled by mental health professionals, Covelli said.

The second encounter was in September 2019 when a family member reported Crimo threatened to “kill everyone.”

Numerous police departments and SWAT teams respond Monday to the area of Second Street and Central Avenue in Highland Park following a shooting that left over three dozen people injured and seven people killed. | Photo: Woo-Sung Shim / Lake and McHenry County Scanner

Police responded and removed 16 knives and other weapons from his residence.

They then notified the Illinois State Police but did not arrest Crimo because there was no probable cause and no criminal complaints were signed, Covelli said.

State police said Tuesday evening that they received the “clear and present danger” report regarding threats Crimo made to his family in September 2019, but no one, including his family, wanted to move forward with a criminal complaint.

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The report also stated that police asked Crimo if he felt like harming himself or others and he said no.

Crimo’s father told police the knives were his and they were in Crimo’s closet for storage.

Highland Park police later returned the knives to the father the same day of the incident, said.

They also did not provide information on threats or Crimo’s mental health that would have allowed police to take more action, state police said.

Crimo did not have a Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card or a pending application for one at the time.

Numerous police departments and SWAT teams respond Monday to the area of Second Street and Central Avenue in Highland Park following a shooting that left over three dozen people injured and seven people killed. | Photo: Woo-Sung Shim / Lake and McHenry County Scanner

“Once this determination was made, Illinois State Police involvement with the matter was concluded,” state police said.

Crimo, who was 19 at the time, later applied for a FOID card in December 2019. His father sponsored the application.

When the application was reviewed in January 2020, “there was insufficient basis to establish a clear and present danger and deny the FOID application.”

Crimo passed four background checks when purchasing firearms on June 9, 2020; July 18, 2020; July 31, 2020 and September 20, 2021.

“The only offense included in the individual’s criminal history was an ordinance violation in January 2016 for possession of tobacco,” state police said.

There were no mental health prohibitor reports submitted by healthcare facilities or personnel, state police added.

Covelli said there are no indications anyone else was involved in the Monday shooting.

Investigators are continuing to work on the case by conducting interviews and reviewing videos, Covelli said.

Crimo is talking to investigators and the motive for the shooting is still unknown.